Our Sycamore Tree

Our Sycamore Tree

I always thought of Sycamore trees as City Trees.

I think because it’s where I saw them when I was growing up.  They were always  in the city parks and school yards in Queens and New York City.   It’s like they were domesticated trees.  Planted by people in public places,  surrounded by cement.

Their smooth blotchy bark was so different from the thick, craggy bark of the  two giant oaks that grew in my back yard in the suburbs on Long Island.  I always thought of Sycamores as being dirty, covered in truck and car exhaust.

It wasn’t until Jon started taking pictures of a Sycamore tree growing on the edge of a corn field, near us, that I began to appreciate them. Until then, I was as if I hadn’t ever really seen them at all.

Now I see the groves of Sycamores growing on the edges of streams and cornfields where ever I drive.    These are not domesticated trees.  They’re as wild as any Oak or Shag Bark Hickory.  And they are gorgeous, their white branches reaching out like the misty fingers of a ghost.

I no longer see Sycamores as blotchy, but mottled in shades of grays, greens, browns and whites. The white bark being the newest, the brown the oldest.  They’re quick-growing hardwood trees, which may be why they were planted in public places.

Now, whenever I look at a Sycamore tree, I think of Jon.  I think of how he opened my eyes to their beauty.  I think of them as “Our Tree”.

A month ago I went looking online for a Sycamore Tree.  I found one right away from Fast-Growing-Trees. com  (I tried to find one locally last year but none of the nurseries around us had any).

Our new Sycamore tree was delivered today.

It came in a long box, the top of the tree bent over to fit.  Jon watered it and we stood it up against the house so the winds that were blowing around the farm wouldn’t knock it over. It’s supposed to rain all day tomorrow, so we’re planning on planting it on Sunday.

My heart gets soft and I can’t help but smile when I think of us planting our Sycamore tree.  I know Jon will water it faithfully throughout the summer as he has all the trees we’ve planted.  I feel like the tree is a symbol of our creative life together, of our love.

I love the idea of watching our Sycamore grow in our yard every year.   And, that it will keep growing, long after we’re gone.

Jon taking a picture of the Sycamore tree on the edge of the corn field.

 

 

 

 

 

14 thoughts on “Our Sycamore Tree

  1. I love sycamore trees and have always wanted one, but we have woods all around us and no more space for one.
    You have the perfect area for one since they like a lot of moisture. Good luck with your tree, you should give it a name.

  2. Jon and the Sycamore. It’s such a simple photo but it evokes so much emotion. I think of the vastness and beauty of nature and the universe and how small we are within it. For all the problems mankind has been responsible for over the years on this beautiful planet, I still believe there is a place for us in this picture. We need to reconnect with nature and find better ways to live without destroying the plants, animals and land that sustains us. So, thank you Maria for this striking photo.

  3. Love, love LOVE that baby sycamore! There is a beautiful old CONDO bldg. here in Brentwood, CA – called the Sycamore and took me years of going by on bus to really SEE the sycamore trees planted on the grounds – I finally realized it was named The Sycamore because of the trees.

    1. So many placed are named after the trees they cut down to build them. It’s really nice to hear that the big old building by you is call Sycamore because of the trees they planted Eileen.

  4. At Christmas on our Tennessee farm, we painted the sycamore tree balls and hung them on our Christmas tree.

  5. The smaller branches of that sycamore tree look like streaks of lightning bolts. I love this picture and your openess to change

  6. My oldest son, when he was about 7 yrs old, told me Sycamores were Army trees because they are wearing camouflage. I grew up knowing them as Buttonwood trees. All the locals called them that because apparently at one time that was what wooden buttons were made from.

    1. I love that Sheila, I can definitely see why your son would say that. And now that you mention it, I do remember hearing that buttons were made from the Sycamore’s pods. Thanks!

  7. Jon and the Sycamore. It’s just a simple photo but it evokes so much emotion. I think about how small we are and the vastness and beauty of nature and the universe. For all the problems mankind has been responsible for over the years on this beautiful planet, I believe we still have a place in this picture. We need to reconnect with nature and find better ways to live without destroying plants, animals and the land that sustains us. So, thank you Maria for that striking photo.
    (I had trouble posting earlier so if this is a repeat, please forgive.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Full Moon Fiber Art