Suzy Being Sheared From Beginning To End

I’ve always put up short videos of the sheep being sheared.   A couple of the videos I posted of Liz shearing the sheep got tens of thousands of views all over the world on YouTube. Many of the people who saw them thought the sheep were being hurt ofrthat it was cruel to shear them.

Of course, it’s actually cruel not to shear sheep. If they are not shorn, their wool continues to grow and mat on them eventually making it difficult if not impossible to move.

There is nothing cruel about shearing sheep.  Once on their back, sheep go dormant and the shearing is like getting a haircut.

This video is three and half minutes long.  It shows the process of clipping the wool and the wool falling off.  In the end, Suzy gets up and walks away.  Then you can see the rest of the sheep checking her out.

When a sheep is first shorn, the other sheep often don’t recognize her, so it takes a little while for them to figure it all out.

In the past I always collected the wool from the sheep as they were being shorn.  But Ian prefers to wait till all the wool is off the sheep before I grab it. It took a few sheep being shorn to drop my old way of doing things and be patient enough to do it Ian’s way.

I finally got it, but not yet in this video.

6 thoughts on “Suzy Being Sheared From Beginning To End

  1. It’s always amazing to watch the process and how adept Ian is at managing to shear all the wool off in one piece, like peeling an apple only MUCH more difficult! Fascinating.

  2. Thanks for this! Kind of relaxing to watch. I know very little about sheep so I’m curious…i know they are fine in the cold, but do they ever shiver after getting shorn since they abruptly naked?

  3. Just gorgeous!!!
    It’s amazing to see the whole pelt come off and it looks so soft!!

  4. As long as they have shelter from the rain or snow and wind they’re fine Gina. The wool keeps them warm in the winter and insulates them from the heat in the summer. After they’re shorn it doesn’t take long for a layer of wool to grow back and that’s enough to do the job. They also have a good layer of fat that protects them.

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