Yoni Tree Fabric Painting

 

I quickly laid out the base of the Yoni Tree, to get a feel for what it will look like,  that I’ll make with the doilies I tea stained

I made the backing for an image I saw in my mind a few days ago. But in looking at it yesterday afternoon I couldn’t see it working the way I imagined.

What I did see was a tree.  Specifically, a Yoni Tree.

Now that I’m aware of them I see them all the time on my walks in the woods. Trees that have a vulva-like opening in them.  Sometimes the openings are on the bottom, sometimes they’re up high on the tree.

A Yoni Tree

I made the vulva that will go inside the opening of the tree from two crocheted roses that I cut apart and sewed back together, a tiny mirror and  two buttons for the clitoris.

The vulva for inside the opening in the tree.

But all the white squares in the old quilt top backing were calling to me.

I knew what they wanted, designs of the ancient goddess.  Those found on the clay figures of the goddess herself and on the pottery representing her.  All the netting and zigzags the birds and bird feet that represent water, the giver or life, like the goddess herself.  Eggs, the goddess becoming and rebirth seen in the circles and spirals.

Interpreting images onto the old quilt top,  from my Language of the Goddess book by Marjia Gimbutas

This isn’t what I expected to be working on this week, but it’s something I’ve been thinking about for a while.  I’m glad I was able to change my mind about what I was doing and let this Yoni Tree be.

“Yoni Tree”, My Fabric Painting

Yoni Tree is sold for sale in my Etsy Shop.  It’s  30″x 47 1/2″ and is  $400 + $20 shipping. 

Yoni is the sanskrit word for vulva, womb, vagina, the sacred place where life comes from.

The next time you take a walk in the woods or down your street, look and I’ll bet you’ll find a Yoni Tree.  A tree with an opening or folds  in it that resemble a vulva or vagina.  Once you start looking for them, they begin make themselves visible to you.

In my Yoni Tree fabric painting, I bring together many different parts of the sacred feminine.  From the symbolism of Yoni herself to the practical and creative endeavors of woman thought history.

The vintage quilt top is hand sewn, using scraps and a traditional quilt pattern, a functional art form.

The doilies were the kind of creative work women were encouraged to do in the past.  Most of them have outlived their function of covering table tops or being draped over chairs.

So I’ve found another purpose for the old worn and torn quilt top and the outdated doilies.  I’m using what other women have created as the raw material for my fabric painting, incorporating the energy they imbued their work with.

I like the juxtaposition  of using permanent marker to draw on the white spaces of the quilt top.  I took imagery from my Language of the Goddess book by Marija Gimbutas to inspire the drawings.

And, as I said  yesterday, the leaves are the extra coins from my coin bra, each sewn on with a blue bead.

This is a close up of some of the branches, drawings and leaves…

At the center of the Yoni is a small mirror that I took from a cholie made in India.  I used two old buttons to make the clitoris. And the surrounding red doily is two doily roses stitched together.

My Yoni Tree, is 30″ x 47 1/2″ and is sold $400 + $20 shipping.  You can buy it in my Etsy Shop, just click here.  Or you can email me here if you’d rather send a check.

 

 

Yoni Tree Poster

I had a few requests from people to make my Yoni Tree fabric painting into a poster.

So yesterday asked artist and graphic designer,  Sara Kelly to help me with the dimensions and to figure out if I needed a border.  She sent me back this pdf and it seems it’s just the right size, as it is, for a 11×17″ poster.

So I put an order in for 30 posters with A&M Printers (our local printing company) and when I get them back I’ll be selling them in my Etsy Shop.  Unless prices have gone up they’ll be $20 including shipping, just like my Show Your Soul and I Am Enough Posters.

You can see and read more about my Yoni Tree fabric painting here. 

 

“Living By Our Felt Sense”

Elizabeth’s quilt

Elizabeth bought the quilt I made a while ago, knowing that she would use it in her healing room.   She recently sent this picture of it and wrote…

“My healing room is really happy and your quilt is still the energetic center.  I recently was given these chakra stones and shown to lay them on my table.  Since I work by phone it creates an energetic grid of the body that helps me during the session, it’s very cool.”

Then Nova, who just  bought my Yoni Tree fabric painting, sent me a email.

She too has a healing room that she’ll hang Yoni Tree in.  She’s finishing up her Shamanic studies.  Nova wrote to me that she was sure I had channeled the piece.  When I asked her what she meant she wrote back…

“Your process on this Yoni hanging was completely felt…when we Iive by our felt sense, we are  connecting to the UnSeen.”

“Yes”, I wrote back to her, “that’s exactly how it happened.”  And that’s just how I create so much of my work.  I never thought of it in those words, but Nova described my process perfectly.

I feel my way through my work, from step to step, never thinking too far ahead, but allowing things to happen and trusting my decisions.

The trust is such an important part  of the process.

Without it, there’s no moving on.  It’s trusting myself, which is important so I can  go inside of me and stay open without being afraid of what’s there.  Also, trusting the unknown.  Those forces at work, whatever they may be, to do whatever it is they do.

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.  It is the source of all true art and science.  He to whom the emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand wrapped in awe is as good as dead-his eyes are closed”  Albert Einstein

 

Our 14th Podcast, Love and Hope, The Week In Bedlam Farm

Sue Silverstein and the Christerer twins at Bishop Maginn School

Jon called it an Owl Scowl and I liked that.  It’s how I was feeling when we began our 14th podcast,  Love and Hope, The Week in Bedlam Farm.

I guess I was just having a grumpy morning, but half way through the podcast my spirits lifted and it may or may not be apparent to those of you who listen to it.  It’s probably a bit like my Bellydancing class, where I can go in feeling yucky  and  a few minutes into it, I start feeling better.

On this latest podcast, we talk about Sue Silverstein, a teacher,  and the kids at Bishop Maginn Catholic School, Bud herding sheep, skirting wool,  our “new” back porch and touched on the Yoni Tree fabric painting I’m working on. (I was still working out the potential “jinx” at that point)

You can listen today’s podcast here.   

And you can listen to any of our Katz and Wulf on Bedlam Farm podcasts anytime by clicking on the “Podcast” buttons on the top or bottom of my blog.  They’re also on iTunes and Google.

Full Moon Fiber Art